Monday, June 30, 2014

The Malik Elite!




Once again, I had the outstanding opportunity to watch Milani Malik work and write about it! 

I love her grind and hope to have her discipline of being a vegan sometime soon. Check out my story on SLAMonline.com below. The camp was an amazing experience for all who attended. The positive energy shut out all negativity and created an atmosphere that was ripe with community, passion, and power. 

Congrats to all the campers who made the cut and to Milani and her team on a phenomenal event! 

Checking out the First-Ever Milani Malik Elite Skills Basketball Clinic

Harlem, NY - The energy in Wadleigh High School’s Earl “The Goat” Manigault gym was amplified by the anticipation of the participants at the inaugural Milani Malik Elite Skills Basketball Clinic where young basketball players were given an exclusive experience that proved to be reflective of the court’s namesake—utterly unforgettable.
A Brooklyn native who came up playing throughout New York City and around the country to playing professionally in multiple countries overseas, Malik always had a heart to give back. Her entrepreneurial spirit could not let her idea stay on her mind for long, so this year; she decided to take action. Malik wanted to show appreciation for a select group of young ball players she knew who were elite amongst their peers or who may have been overlooked, but were highly skilled and had the passion, drive, and focus to become elite.
Read the rest of the story on slamonline.com here



Saturday, June 21, 2014

New Video

                      
                                             Mia Hall (Reel) Editing and Video by Michael Hall on Vimeo.

Recently, I have had a goal to speak more.

Very thankful for the opportunities that I have had to speak and share my story thus far. I aim to continue inspiring others. Hope you like the new video!

Pax,

Mi

Friday, May 30, 2014

Dr. Maya Angelou

                               

I am so blessed to have a woman like Dr. Angelou live during my lifetime. Though I only saw her once at Christian Cultural Center, Still I Rise, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, and many of her works have inspired me to keep writing and write well. 

What a triumphant example of how to take your pain and turn it into power. Dr. Maya will always be legendary and her legacy will live on for generations. 

#Mayataughtme: 
  1. To love myself therefore allowing others to love me
  2. It's OK to seclude yourself from the world and focus on a task (as she did for many of her works
  3. I need not be cowardly, but consistently courageous. I am a child of God
My friend Gabby shared a poem that I never read before, but it is definitely being added to my favorites. 

May you live each day to be remembered. 

A WOMAN SHOULD HAVE ... by Maya Angelou

A WOMAN SHOULD HAVE …
enough money within her control to move out and rent a place of her own, even if she never wants to or needs to…

A WOMAN SHOULD HAVE …
something perfect to wear if the employer or date of her dreams wants to see her in an hour…

A WOMAN SHOULD HAVE …
a youth she’s content to leave behind….

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Hope for the Hopeless - FOD Journey to Healing Event

             

Yesterday, I had the opportunity to attend "Faces of Darkness: Journey to Healing," an event at the Schomburg in Harlem, that brought light to the fundraising taking place for a documentary by the same name. Produced by Squeaky Moore, Kenneth "KT" Nelson, Terrie M. Williams and Mari Yanuzzi, "Faces of Darkness" brings a fresh perspective regarding the issues of suicide and depression in the Black community and aims to help to those who are suffering receive healing.

I discovered this event through Hampton University Alumnae Danielle Wright, whom also majored in Sport Management at HU, and Kristen L. Pope who MC'd the event. I am very glad I was able to attend as I believe suicide is preventable and can be deterred, should people receive proper help and the stigma surrounding psychological help, change.

According to the film, depression affects 14 million Americans, though Black men are less likely seek help than their counterparts. The sports world took notice when Chiefs player Jovan Belcher killed his girlfriend and then drove to the team's headquarters and shot himself. Though his mental issues were from poor treatment of his concussions, help would have prevented his and his girlfriend's death. Years earlier, Donnie Moore of the California Angels, shot his wife and then himself after years of depression and denying help from his coaching staff.